Our Attorneys Fight to Force Businesses to Change

At Myers Law, we focus our efforts in each case on trying to maximize compensation for our clients while striving to create far-reaching change in the way bad companies treat their customers. We have been successful in getting Ohio courts to hold bad companies responsible for repeated or damaging illegal conduct. As a public service, we post judgments from these cases to our website when courts have declared certain conduct to violate the law, or when courts have issued injunctions against companies because of illegal conduct.

These are some examples of the power that courts have, and the protections available to consumers, under state and federal consumer laws. These are not promises or representations of outcomes to expect. They are posted here to show what the courts are empowered to do, and also to warn others about the judgments or agreements concerning these companies. In many of these cases, the courts have also declared certain conduct to violate the State of Ohio’s Consumer Sales Practices Act.

  • Aldridge Home Improvement, Ltd. – Home Improvement contractor found liable for committing nineteen different violations of the Ohio Consumer Sales Practices Act, and the court ordered a permanent injunction against the contractor prohibiting it from entering into any more consumer transactions in Ohio until conditions are met.
  • Ashley Contractors, LLC, Brian Stepp, and Ashley Nihiser – Home improvement construction contractor and its owners/officers found liable for committing seventeen deceptive acts under the Ohio Consumer Sales Practices Act.
  • William Burke – Court declared that this construction contractor engaged in seventeen violations of Ohio’s consumer protection law and other violations of Cleveland’s consumer protection ordinance. The Court prohibited this contractor from engaging in any more consumer transactions for home repair work in the State of Ohio until conditions are met.
  • DDY, Inc. and Geoffrey Goll – Medical bill collectors agreed to Court-ordered injunctions prohibiting certain conduct.
  • Dennis Gadowski – Court declared that this construction contractor violated an Ohio consumer protection law, and issued an order prohibiting this person from engaging in consumer transactions for home improvements in the State of Ohio until conditions are met.
  • Hall Holdings International, Ltd. and Bertrand Hall – Court declared that this custom suit provider committed eleven violations of the Ohio Consumer Sales Practices Act consumer protection law.
  • Nathaniel Webb – Court declared that this construction contractor violated an Ohio consumer protection law, and issued an order prohibiting this person from engaging in consumer transactions for home improvements in the State of Ohio until conditions are met.
  • Walmart & Sam’s Club – Retailer agreed to Court-approved class action settlement including “Programmatic Relief” which required the creation of an electronic solution addressing a tax calculation issue.
  • Paul Schneider and Lynda Schneider – Court found these individuals owned or were officers of Mountain Creations, Inc., and declared that these individual owners/officers committed sixteen violations of Ohio’s consumer protection law.

Why does it matter what a court declares? When a Court issues a “declaratory judgment” in one of our consumer cases, it is declaring that a company engaged in conduct that violates one or more Ohio consumer protection laws. These court declarations are then sent to the Ohio Attorney General’s Office, where they are included in a searchable database. Once they are put into the database, all companies doing business with consumers are prohibited from engaging in the same bad conduct. This helps to protect all consumers from all companies in Ohio, not just the specific company involved in the case.

It Is Important to Research the Businesses Before You Use Them.

pexels-photo-941555.jpegBefore hiring a construction contractor, shopping at a car dealership, buying a home warranty, or making a big purchase, it is worth looking up information about the business online. Just because they can afford radio or TV commercials does not mean that they are any good. We have sued plenty of “reputable” contractors, and businesses who claim they’ve “never been sued before” for some awful conduct. While getting a referral to a business from a trusted friend or family member may be a good start, it is important to check on these businesses yourself.

You should check reviews not only with the Better Business Bureau, but also to search for complaints with the Ohio Attorney General and local common pleas courts. Over time, we will add more publicly available information to this page about contractors and other businesses, so that consumers can hear more information before they decide to hire them.

Just because a business appears on this page does not mean they are a bad business or do bad work, and Myers Law and its attorneys are not passing any judgment on these businesses. Judges and juries will pass judgments.  We merely aim to provide some additional, publicly available information about these businesses that consumers may find useful, or may want to know.